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Tuesday, July 25, 2006 The director-general of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), Pascal Lamy, suspended negotiations in the Doha round of trade talks on Monday, after a meeting of six “core” negotiators India, Brazil, the United States, European Union, Japan, and Australia in Geneva failed to make any headway in reconciling differences over agricultural trade liberalisation. The US wanted cuts in import tariffs for farm products, which were rejected by EU, Japan and India, who asked for cuts in agricultural subsidies. Peter Mandelson, the EU trade commissioner, told the Financial Times: “If the US continues to demand dollar-for-dollar compensation in market access [cutting tariffs] for reducing domestic support, no one in the developing world will ever buy that and the EU will not either.” Brazil also identified the US stand on subsidies as the reason the talks failed. Susan Schwab, the US trade representative, said that the other countries sought…

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Sunday, September 25, 2005 Hurricane Katrina has rekindled debate over the controversial Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005, in the U.S. House of Represenatives. Congressional Democrats feel that among the hundreds of thousands of victims of Katrina, many of whom have lost all their possessions and are coping with relocation, those that declare bankruptcy should be granted the protections of the previous law. 32 Democrats have sponsored a proposal that would delay implementing certain parts of the law to “insure that we do not compound a natural disaster with a man made financial disaster.” The new bankruptcy law affects anyone whose income (as of the six months before filing) was over the state median income. Democratic legislators point out that many hurricane victims who manage to find work will be suffering from wage reductions, making them unable to effectively deal with their previous debts. Among U.S. states,…

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Sunday, July 4, 2021 On Thursday, 130 countries and jurisdictions in the 139-member Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) agreed to support an overhaul to the international taxation system that would introduce a global minimum corporate tax rate, committing most of the world’s economies to a two-pillar “solution”. The states which agreed to the plan’s key components included regional divisions such as Gibraltar, Hong Kong and Montserrat, tax havens according to the Associated Press (AP) Bermuda and the Cayman Islands and all Group of Twenty (G20) countries, according to an OECD list, but not Barbados, Estonia, Hungary, Ireland, Kenya, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Peru also abstained, but due to its lack of government, reported The Guardian. Those that have signed represent over 90% of global gross domestic product (GDP). A press release by the OECD called the framework the result of “negotiations coordinated by…

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More On This Topic: Health Insurance Plans For Opt Status Not all hospitals are created equal. Most people don’t really thing about the selection of a hospital. When they need a procedure done they often times go to the hospital the doctor doing the surgery is affiliated with. In emergency situations, people are either taken to a hospital where the ambulance takes them or go to the nearest hospital from where they presently are. People often do not even know if they are being medically cared for by a reputable hospital.If you want to locate the best hospitals in your area you can do some simple research. There usually is rating information on the hospitals in your area. Good hospitals are often nominated for excellence in certain categories. You may not be fortunate to live near a top rated hospital. IF you feel you need to be treated in one…

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Friday, January 20, 2017 Yesterday, the German Bundestag passed a law to legalise cannabis drug for medicinal purposes. The law is to come under effect in March. “Seriously ill people must be treated in the best ways possible” ((de))German language: ?Schwerkranke Menschen müssen bestmöglich versorgt werden., German health minister Hermann Gröhe tweeted. Doctors can prescribe marijuana — cannabis — for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, or loss of appetite or nausea from cancer’s chemotherapy treatment. Christian Democrats (CDU) lawmaker Rainer Hayek said this law would still prevent recreational use of cannabis. The cost of cannabis is to be covered under health insurance. Patients can buy dried buds or cannabis extracts from pharmacies with a prescription or get synthetic derivatives from other countries, though possession of the drug in large quantities is not allowed. Cannabis cultivation is to be monitored by the government. Germany has joined other European countries…

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Saturday, July 1, 2006 California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a bipartisan state budget Friday that invests a record $55.1 billion in education – an increase of $3.1 billion this year and $8.3 billion over the last two years – and allocates $4.9 billion to create a budget reserve and to pay down the state’s debt early. Schwarzenegger credited bipartisan cooperation in coming up with a budget he was willing to sign, and do it on time, a rarity in recent California politics. “It’s amazing what can be accomplished when Democrats and Republicans work together in Sacramento,” said Schwarzenegger. “I want to thank the legislative leadership – Senators Don Perata and Dick Ackerman, Speaker Fabian Nunez and Assembly Republican Leader George Plescia – for all their hard work on the budget. We put politics aside and were driven by the overwhelming desire to do what’s best for the people of California.…

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Tuesday, August 16, 2011 A new law which seeks to utilise reusable energy and minimise cost impact on consumers is under development in Japan. The new law, which would be effective from July 1 next year, would seek to reduce Japan’s dependency on nuclear power. The new legislation would urge power utilities to cut costs by purchasing renewable energy from outside companies and private businesses. Japan’s decision has been referred to as opening the door on renewable energy, which currently only contributes to six percent of Japan’s energy sources. Politicians have amended the bill, allowing the revised bill to pass through parliament later this month. Prime Minister Naoto Kan who is pushing for the bill to be passed in return for his resignation, has stated that the ‘feed-in-tariff on renewable energy will be set at a fixed price so that utilities are limited to purchasing electricity from renewable power generators. Kan…

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More On This Topic: Best Dog Attack Law Firm San Diego Grocery shopping is not the most dangerous activity you could do, but sometimes because of the negligence of a business, you could end up seriously injured. You could have a slip-and-fall or something different. If it is because a business is not being careful, you can sue. You will need a personal injury attorney to help you. Some things to look for in a personal injury attorney are their reputation, professionalism, and affordability. Looking at these areas may help you to locate the best attorney for what you are looking for.The reputation of a personal injury attorney is important because it will tell you more of how they might treat you and help you in your case. If you know someone else who has had an accident in a situation like yourself and had good success with the law…

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Tuesday, June 13, 2006 Members of the All India Bank Employees Association have threatened to go on nation-wide strikes to express their unhappiness with the move to privatise banks, allowing foreign direct investment in the banking sector and outsourcing of services. The exact dates of the strike will be decided at the AIBEA national general council meeting to be held in Chennai on June 13 and 14. Speaking to press persons on Friday, C.H. Venkatachalam, secretary of the association, condemned the attempts to continuously `attack the financial and banking sector.’ This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details. This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details. The AIBEA was against the government’s intention to privatise public sector banks and the disinvestment of shares up to 49 per cent. In the past decade, a number of private…

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Tuesday, April 3, 2007 The discovery of an old World War II bomb in a construction site has caused at least 1000 residents in Plymouth located in South-West England, to be evacuated. “Evacuations are being carried out of properties within 100m [328ft] of the scene. Properties within the 100m-300m [328-984ft] zone are being advised to open windows and draw curtains,” said a spokesman for the police department in Plymouth. Workers on the site discovered the bomb at about 10:30 a.m. local time in Plymouth, England on Brentor Road. Reports say that the bomb is sticking out of the ground by about 6 inches, and weighed an estimated 113 kilograms, or 250 pounds, but could have weighed as much as 500 pounds. “The item was protruding about six inches from the ground and was described as being up to 10-inches in diameter,” said a spokesman for the Devon and Cornwall Police.…

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